The Traditions we Live by…

rockwell thanksgiving

This post is back by popular request….

The TV commercials and internet advertisements have begun; images of idyllic family celebrations.  Thanksgiving is upon us, as are the Winter holidays; seasons full of expectations, hope and resolutions.

One of the dynamics at play this time of year is that the approaching season is the most tradition-based on the calendar.  Families are often attempting to create something akin to the quintessential turkey-laden feast Norman Rockwell made famous in the painting above.  How might this relate to my college student, you ask?  Continue reading →

Seasonal shifts –

winter field

With the arrival of both cold weather and, for many, the advent of daylight savings time, we all have some reaction to the changing seasons.  Whether it is dark when we wake or dark when we leave school or work, the shift in seasons brings any number of reactions.

For some, the shift can also be associated with other issues.  I’d like to thank Dr. Jesse Viner from the Yellowbrick Treatment Center for the chart you’ll find below explaining one of the more recent phenomena in the world of mental health issues. Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression associated with late autumn and winter and thought to be caused by Continue reading →

Scared to Fail!

failed report card

In the course of writing the entries for CP101, the most “re-posted” or shared piece I have ever done here was on the topic of failure: Learning to Fail.  I sense that underneath much of our fear for the choices and decisions our daughters and sons make is that the decision will lead to failure.

When it comes down to it, its not really the failure we’re afraid of, but what comes after that: the fear of the unknown, we commonly call it.  The irony of it is, we can’t be afraid of what we don’t know!  So here is a great article addressing the fears as much as the failure and how we get tripped up around both.

Enjoy!

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3027404/scared-of-failing-ask-yourself-these-6-fear-killing-questions?partner=newsletter

 

Year in the Life of a Freshman: November

November

Transition Issues

  • Excitement about Thanksgiving break
  • Talk about your expectations around family traditions & rituals
  • Registration for spring semester is coming up

Tips for Successful Parenting

Phone calls about low grades, difficult relationships or ruining a favorite t-shirt in the wash may be tough for you to hear, but none of them are the end of the world – yours or hers.  Be patient when you get those “nothing is going right and I Continue reading →

Leaning into Change

change

When we are asked to change something, we’re likely to encounter a number of feelings: fear and anger are undoubtedly among them. But we may recognize that in the course of our lives we encounter or are asked to change a number of things which, sometimes, without even thinking, we do on a daily basis.

We change clothes – sometimes several times a day. Like it or not, we must change our child’s diapers. We change lanes driving the highway. We change our clocks back and forth each year. We live in the rhythms of the changing weather and the seasons. And, at times, we are aware that our feelings change by the second.

I wonder as I sit with this brief list of changes, among all the others which are now floating across the screen of my mind, what difference there is in my response, and therefore my resistance, to changes which are external (lane changes, which shirt to wear today, etc.) and those which are internal (what is my fear asking of me, do I need to alter my vocation, etc.). My sense of my own varying responses is that there are far deeper feelings about those inner questions of change; feelings that are so much more connected to my sense of myself, my purpose and meaning, and my hope that I do not yet know.

These “invitations” to change or consider change seem to threaten what I have put in place to keep things “ok” – whatever that means – such that I am once again faced with my inability (read: lack of control) to set a course which will not steer me into uncharted waters.

I recognize that this is the territory of fear. Anytime I am entertaining a need to control something/someone, I am now aware that I am feeling fear. It may not be the thing/person I am trying to control, but there is fear in the air. So invitations to change present me with a threshold to cross; a doorway into new space that holds something new which I do not yet know or see.

If I view ALL my fear as “bad”, then I learn to steer clear or avoid these doorways, and I’m aware of a lot of energy I’ve spent avoiding those places in which I have been asked to enter unknown space. But as the years pass, I have – gladly – begun to recognize that the “gift of fear” is learning to pay attention; to be alert, not so much vigilance, but open awareness: actually look for something new, rather than looking out for what to avoid.

I suppose this speaks to a posture, posture of leaning. The recognition I’m speaking of here is a directional one; one that asks me to be aware of which direction I am leaning toward the ceaseless invitations around change. My work then, as I sense it is for all of us, is to note which way I am leaning: leaning away from, or in to?

 

Welcome to the Real World

If you’ve followed CP101 for any measurable time, you know that I rarely endorse a product or an author unless I sense it has direct application to our on-going conversation about the ways we might contribute to our daughter or son’s competency.

That being said, I want to introduce you to a new book: Welcome to the Real World, but Lauren Berger*.  Though Lauren’s target audience is the recent college graduate, much of her perspective and advice comes from her extensive experience with internships.  In fact her company is called: InternQueen.com.  Since internship experiences are a very prevalent aspect to current university curricula, and, with the skyrocketing growth of college-aged entrepreneurs, I sense Lauren has much to add.

Even though the basis of the book is about Continue reading →

A Year in the Life of a Freshman: October

October

Transition Issues

  • Time management & setting priorities
  • Mid-term projects and expectations of academic performance
  • Missing home and old friends

Tips for Successful Parenting

Write often – postcards, letters, emails, it all matters!  Although your student is in the throws of new experiences they are still anxious to hear from home.  There isn’t a student alive who won’t get excited about a care package from home full of Continue reading →

Learning to Play ~

learning to play

I ran across a great article from NPR recently which seems to me to have a notable bearing on our conversation about what we believe to be true about ourselves and about others; particularly about our children.  I sense it merits our consideration.  I’d be intrigued to hear from you about how this strikes you…

http://www.npr.org/blogs/13.7/2014/06/30/326935808/three-psychological-findings-i-wish-i-d-known-in-high-school

Longing to Leave

empty nest

The following is an excerpt from Irish writer/poet John O’Donohue from his book, Eternal Echoes: Celtic Reflections on our Yearning to Belong (italics added).

I hear in John’s words the very heart of the message of what it means to parent well and to be an attentive human with strong intention. May his words serve us well…

Peace, Dane

“The loneliness and creativity of being a parent is the recognition that family is inevitably temporary. Good parenting is unselfish and, to encourage independence in a child that has received unconditional love, acts to reinforce the sense and essence of belonging.  Nothing, not even departure, can sever that intrinsic sense of belonging.  Children are created to grow and leave the nest.  Family provides the original and essential belonging in the world.  It is the cradle where identity unfolds and firms.  Such belonging outgrows itself. Home becomes too small and too safe.  The young adult is called to new longing to leave home and undertake new discovery.  The difficulty for parents is Continue reading →

A Year in the Life of a Freshman: September

September

Transition Issues

  • New relationships
  • Testing new freedom
  • Money, Money, Money

Tips for Successful Parenting

Being homesick is often just as much of an issue for you as a parent as it is for your student.  The first few weeks of college are packed with events to help students become engaged in campus life.  The challenges of meeting new people and learning the campus culture take time and energy.  Even if they don’t Continue reading →