Looking & Seeing

looking.seeing

I find today a new sense of gratitude for Thomas Merton’s perspective…

“Because looking means that you already have something in mind for your eye to find; you’ve set out in search of your desired object and have closed off everything else presenting itself along the way.  But seeing is being open and receptive to what comes to the eye; your vision total and not targeted.”

Ron Seitz, Song for Nobody, A Memory Vision of Thomas Merton (italics added)
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Year in the Life of a Freshman: April

April

Transition Issues

  • Registration for next Fall semester
  • Finalize summer plans
  • Final projects

Tips for Successful Parenting

Summer is just around the corner, and it’s time to finalize plans for the break.  Will he choose to be a camp counselor, take a summer internship, or come home to work &/or take classes at the local college?  These are all decisions that you’re encouraged to Continue reading →

Letting Go is Seeing Farther…

horizon

When I began this blog several years ago, I wondered if I might run out of ways to keep talking about this topic.  It seemed that I, or you the readers, would at some point tire of the conversation or say, “Enough, I get it already…”  Well, neither of those have materialized.  The practice of breathing in and breathing out each rhythmic cycle is itself a reminder that we’re each taking in what we need and letting go of what we don’t; mostly without giving it a lot of thought, though we’re perpetually in the act of “letting go” in order to stay alive.

I know that in similar ways, though more complex, we are asked to consider doing the same in relationships as well, and often no more direct is this on-going fulcrum that we call parenting.  As I write this I am processing the feelings of being in dialogue with my young adult daughter about an international work assignment she is pursuing.  Feelings of gratitude and pride for her work ethic which has paved the way for this assignment sit alongside feelings of sadness for the time away that will inhibit us having regular face-to-face interactions.

This felt so resonant in a recent offering on the Continue reading →

Year in the Life of a Freshman: March

March

Transition Issues:

  • Distracted by spring weather – focus, focus, focus
  • Pending end of the year projects
  • Considering Student Housing options for Fall

Tips for Successful Parenting

Spring is here!  Flowers are blooming and the weather is looking up – a real distraction from being cooped-up during the winter months.  There are Frisbees to be flown, naps to be taken on the lawn, and, oh yeah, and tests and papers and presentations to prepare for.  Understand your students’ desire to Continue reading →

The Underground Journey

winter field

It would appear by the evening forecast that with few exceptions, we’ve no choice, no matter our zip code, but to acknowledge that winter has arrived in force.  As I type this there are winter storm warnings across much of the country.

I’m an avid gardener.  This season is one in which both I and the visible garden rest.  The fall greens have succumbed to the latest cold snap.  The sweet potatoes are dug and stored in the basement.  The wilted peas, cucumber vines, and spent tomato plants are piled in the compost bin.   

The garlic bulbs planted in late October and the daffodil bulbs I plant every fall (beautifully referred to by author Christopher DeVinck as “the flames of Continue reading →

Year in the Life of a Freshman: February

February

Transition Issues:

  • Plans for Spring Break?
  • Conversations about Alcohol & other drugs
  • Begin thinking about summer employment &/or summer school
  • Do I still want to major in this?

Tips for Successful Parenting

Spring Break is right around the corner.  Most students have been thinking about any number of options they might have: going home, staying on-campus to make extra money, or heading to the beach or mountains with friends.  This is a great opportunity to talk about his plans, as well as share your expectations about things like, who is financing a trip or what he might do if Continue reading →

A New Beginning

open door

 

We find ourselves again at the beginning of yet another year; fresh with the memory of those things left unchecked only a handful of days ago.  There has been for generations, a practice of starting over; of pressing on, when the calendar adds another number to the growing stack of our days.

I have ceased making resolutions for some years now, as I realize that much of the energy around those that I did make was the weight of what I had left unfinished; in a sense I was dragging that weight into the new year hoping to make an old thing different. One of the significant aspects of letting go of “resolution-making” was the recognition that I, Continue reading →

Year in the Life of a Freshman: January

January

Transition Issues

  • Readjusting to leaving home again
  • Getting back into the swing of campus life
  • Rethink her/his level of campus involvement and commitments
  • Conversations about academic performance & life choices

Tips for Successful Parenting

Lead with questions.  Most students still want their parent(s) to express interest in what she is doing; she will most likely still seek your permission/blessing for what she wants to do.  Try using “open-ended questions” (questions that demand more than a “yes” or “no” response) that allow her to tell you details while Continue reading →

Seasonal shifts —

winter field

With the arrival of both cold weather and/or the passing of the holiday season’s activities, we all have some reaction to the changing seasons.  Whether it is dark when we wake or dark when we leave school or work, the shift in seasons brings any number of reactions.

For some, the shift can also be associated with other issues.  I’d like to thank Dr. Jesse Viner from the Yellowbrick Treatment Center for the chart you’ll find below explaining one of the more recent phenomena in the world of mental health issues. Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression associated with late autumn and winter and thought to be caused by Continue reading →

Year in the Life of a Freshman: December

December

Transition Issues:

  • Concern about academic demands – finals & projects
  • Talk about expectations for holiday break – s/he isn’t in high school anymore
  • Anticipation of good food, lots of sleep and seeing old and new friends
  • Re-evaluate finances

Tips for Successful Parenting

Expect change – plenty of it. The son you dropped off in August will not be the one who comes home for the winter holiday. Change is not only inevitable, it’s expected and necessary for healthy relationships.  Your student will experience new relationships, academic challenges and Continue reading →